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You don’t really want a million dollars


Posted in Entrepreneurship, Goals, Inspiration, Posts by

This morning, I was feeling a little stir-crazy from being cooped up in my office, so I decided to stretch my legs and go to the cornerstore down the street. I got a bag of chips and while paying, asked the guy behind the counter how he was doing. He responded with a heavy sigh and said “Tired, man. I need a million dollars and i need to travel. Things are bad right now, man.” He made a tired half-joke about how maybe he’d win the lottery scratcher this week.

He didn’t offer any more info and I didn’t want to pry, so I told him that I hoped things would pick up for him, paid for my chips, and left. Walking home, I couldn’t shake a feeling of sadness about the conversation. I know what it feels to have life kick you in the teeth, and feel like you just need to get away from everything. How many times have I thought to myself “If only I had a million dollars.” However, I’ve come to realize that the wishful desire to have an arbitrarily large amount of money is a reflection of lazy thinking.

That sounds harsh, I know. Don’t get me wrong: I sympathize with this guy and I’m not trying to be dismissive of his situation. And I don’t even know what his situation is; maybe he really does need a million dollars for medical bills or something. But I doubt it. What’s more likely is that he’s just down on his luck, struggling through a rough time, and sees a large pile of cash as the solution.

In The 4-Hour Work Week, Tim Ferriss talks about an investment banker friend who was working 80 hours a week for a big payoff in ten years, when he’d be making several million dollars per year. When Tim asked what he’d do with all that money when he got it, his response was “Take a trip to Thailand.”

The sadness of this answer is profound; too many people have come to believe that it will cost them millions to really live the life they want. How many people do you know who wish they had a million dollars? Probably more than you think. But the sad part is that most people don’t even want a million dollars; they want the things they think a million dollars can buy.

The biggest thing on that list: freedom.

But freedom doesn’t cost a million dollars. You can change, learn to live on your income, save money, travel on almost nothing, live abroad, follow your dreams. The world is full of more and more possibilities every day. More and more people are discovering freedom and opportunity beyond what they really thought was possible. Gary Vaynerchuk does a fantastic job of detailing these opportunities in Crush It!.

I spent months traveling around southeast Asia on a shoestring budget. I work for myself, when I want, where I want, on what I want, and I’m not wealthy by any stretch. Ironically, I’ve seen huge increases in my earned income, passive income, and net worth in the three years since I took the risk of breaking free and trying to create the life I want instead of waiting for it to come to me.

Here’s the reality: if you’re not the type of person who can create freedom without a million dollars, you probably aren’t the kind of person who will get a million dollars. Because both take a certain kind of ingenuity, discipline, and proactivity that most people seem to lack.

If you’re really interested in knowing what the journey looks like, check out Crush It! and The 4-Hour Work Week. You might not find everything in these books to be useful to your situation, but I guarantee it will spark some curiosity and new ideas in you, no matter who you are. I think I’ll give a copy of each to the guy around the corner next time I see him.

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91 Responses to “You don’t really want a million dollars”

  1. 1_mil_plz says:

    You're wrong. I do want a million dollars.

    • ryanwaggoner says:

      Why?

      • keithburgun says:

        Pay off the house? Get a car that works? Save the rest for if there's a health problem since no one can afford health insurance and it wont help you anyway, so that you don't have to sell said house and car?

        Just being an ass, though. Great article.

        • ryanwaggoner says:

          My wife and I pay $180 / month for good health insurance from a major carrier.

          • keithburgun says:

            whoa, badass. I live in the US.

          • Paul Stamatiou says:

            wah, I pay $80 for absolute barebones very crappy $5,000 deductible health insurance and I'm in great health. When I had a decent plan it was over $330. Is it because I'm 24 and carriers assume I'm reckless or something?

          • ryanwaggoner says:

            My wife and I pay like $175 total for health and dental from a major carrier, and our deductible is either 1500 or 2500. Maybe we got lucky?

      • dude says:

        Because it's better than not having it… Honestly. You make some good points in the article, but you can't actually figure that travelling on 'almost nothing' is what people want to do with their millions? Tell me I don't need any significant money to go on an around the world vacation for 3 months staying in the penthouse suites of the top hotels in the world. Tell me I don't need significant money to buy a summer home in Spain and fly there each year. Tell me I don't need significant money to stay on the private off-shore island at Sandals Royal Bahamian.

        Let me put it this way, if you told me I could go on a vacation to Japan and spend less than 5k I _wouldn't want to go_! What a nightmare that would be! No. Preferable to travel in style, or not at all.

        • ryanwaggoner says:

          Meh. To each their own, but my point is that you seem more fixated on the money than what it is you actually want.

      • Ryan,

        I think there is a fundamental difference between wanting and need. Obviously, the intention of your post is pointing at releasing the perceived “need” but maintaining the “want” aspect of abundance.

        So, yes, you are wrong. I do want a million dollars (I want more, in fact, I want a million dollars to come in every day). However, do I need it? Hell no, I’ve even backpacked in other countries with no money. So, I will affirm your point that freedom is a state of mind and wealthy or poor it is yours to cultivate.

        Money does some nice things in this world. But ultimately, what has been driving my abundance hasn’t been out of a desire for freedom, it has been the exploring of my freedom (by innovating and building things that excite me) that has brought me abundance. That’s the best part of it all. I feel free, I get to explore my freedom, and I’m abundant because of it.

        • ryanwaggoner says:

          Sorry, but I disagree. We “want” a million dollars in such a watered-down abstract way that it means nothing at all.

  2. jml says:

    I dunno – It's very easy to run a medical bill in the several hundreds of dollar range – especially if you have cancer or need dialysis, etc.

    It's very likely that people DO need that million, or at least medical coverage in the million dollar range.

    This advice does nothing for the growing population of people with medical complications, arthritis, diabetes, HIV, cancer, etc.

    • ryanwaggoner says:

      Yeah, I'd need to see some statistics on what percentage of the population is saddled with hundreds of thousands in medical bills before I'd believe that a random guy I talked to who mentioned that he needed a million dollars needs it because he had cancer or a liver transplant.Don't get me wrong, it sucks for those who are facing these medical bankruptcy problems, and we clearly need to fix something that's broken in our system. Just not convinced that's why most people think they need a million bucks.

    • Perhaps the reason why people have so many illnesses is because they are working to much to get money.

      How's that saying go?

      "Young people trade their time and health for money, only to use money later in life to buy time and health."

  3. jml says:

    several hundreds of thousands of dollars I meant.

  4. joelhoward says:

    “if you’re not the type of person who can create freedom without a million dollars, you probably aren’t the kind of person who will get a million dollars.”

    Beautifully said. Nice post!

  5. Peter V. says:

    I don’t want a million dollars from you but can you send me a copy of those books too?

  6. Fabio says:

    Apart from the nice article, I think that having a millon dollars you don’t have to work any more.
    And this is a huge improvement for a person who has a low income and it has some problems.
    So a lot of people don’t want freedom, they don’t want to have a bad work even if they don’t own a degree.

  7. It's a fallacy of causation. I see millionaires with ingenuity and drive, and I imagine their million dollars gave them those qualities, rather than vice versa. Hell, it's either that or come to terms with my own limitations.

    • anthony says:

      you're wrong. those who lack ingenuity and drive will amount to nothing. success does not just fall into your lap. you have to earn it. unless your name is paris hilton

  8. anon says:

    http://eriehalloffame.com/nominees/Boyd3.asp

    "Boyd wanted to work for free, but was not allowed, so he accepted the bare minimum, one day's pay in a fortnight. He once told Spinney (Frank "Chuck" Spinney) that there were two ways to be free: to become rich, or to cut your needs to the bone. He didn't think he could become rich, so he did the latter.[5]"

  9. Paul Stamatiou says:

    Okay maybe not a million dollars but I'll take $100k to pay off my 4.9-8.9% student loans and maybe another $20k to pay off my car. ;)

  10. Tripluca says:

    You are right. I did it myself. Left my job, went traveling, started my small online business and been on the road for 10 years.
    I am not rich, I don't need a million dollar (but I would love it!) and i can confirm that it's not easy but also not as hard as it seems .

  11. ryanwaggoner says:

    Good for you! Where are you, what do you do, etc?

  12. Ferid says:

    I would invest every penny of it in new cool innovative startups…

    Maybe even some in europe, there is really no capital for cool IT-startups over there…

    • ryanwaggoner says:

      Why do you want to invest in startups?

      • dude says:

        Because he _wants to_. This is a core misunderstanding on your part. You assume people will be cool with just floating along in hostels and eating no-name groceries. He wants to invest in startups because that's what interests him. An interest that requires money — shocking, I know :/

      • Nick says:

        Is this a Philosophy 101 exercise where you keep asking why so that you can eventually steer it towards Maslow's hierarchy of needs? Puh-lease!

  13. Johnny says:

    Is this a blog post or an informecial about two books where you make affiliate sales off them?

    • ryanwaggoner says:

      I never hesitate to recommend books or anything else that I find helpful, and if there's an affiliate program, I take advantage of it. I also never promote anything I don't believe in. If you doubt me at my word, so be it, and I'd highly (highly) encourage you to NOT purchase the books in question.

  14. kayoone says:

    I think the 4 Hour work week is a big scam. Tim Ferris surely knows how to promote himself, but all in all the books lacks alot of substance. As if anybody could outsource all his life and run a successfull online biz. What if everybody would do that ? Yeah right, it wouldnt work out anymore. He lets things look so easy in that book while in reality they simply arent.

    Not everbody can just work as a freelancer, also many people have familys and cant just live somewhere else for a year…

    • ryanwaggoner says:

      “What if everyone did that?” is the lowest form of retort. What if everyone went to medical school and became a doctor? We'd have no one in other professions! Does it then follow that no one should become a doctor?Also, I successfully DID much of what Tim outlines in the 4HWW, at least in principle. I don't work four hours a week, but that's not what the book is really about anyway.

    • ryanwaggoner says:

      “What if everyone did that?” is the lowest form of retort. What if everyone went to medical school and became a doctor? We'd have no one in other professions! Does it then follow that no one should become a doctor?Also, I successfully DID much of what Tim outlines in the 4HWW, at least in principle. I don't work four hours a week, but that's not what the book is really about anyway.

  15. DocuMaker says:

    I agree that the "million dollars" reference is a figure of speech because a million dollars really isn't that much anymore. "I wish I had a million dollars" translates to "I wish I didn't have to struggle so hard to pay my bills." Nothing more, nothing less, cause that's all a million dollars is worth today.

  16. Darren says:

    With all due respect, I do want at least a million dollars.
    Although I assume you're right about some people, they probably don't actually want this much money.

    But personally, after a huge amount of consideration and analysis, I've decided to shoot for more than just a million dollars.

    I want to travel the world and see as much of it as I possibly can. Sure I know I could do this on a 'shoestring' budget. But honestly, why would I fly cramped in Economy class when I could be going comfortably in First class (or for example, on my private jet)?
    Why would I stay in low-class hotels, when I could stay in luxury hotels and enjoy myself even more?
    Why would I even spend a second of my time thinking about where next month's finances will come from, or worrying what will happen in the case of an emergency, when I could have a plastic card in my wallet with a seemingly endless amount of money?

    I'm also going to get a penthouse in NYC, and a nice place in SF. I don't really know what to add to this, but why would I not want those?

    • ryanwaggoner says:

      Hey, I love nice things, don't get me wrong. But that's not really the point…Let me ask you this: after your consideration and analysis, how much money do you need to accomplish your specific goals?And much, much more importantly, what are you doing today to get closer to those goals?The problem with saying you “want a million dollars” is that for 99% of people, it's an abstract goal based on nothing, and it'll go nowhere.

    • ryanwaggoner says:

      Hey, I love nice things, don't get me wrong. But that's not really the point…Let me ask you this: after your consideration and analysis, how much money do you need to accomplish your specific goals?And much, much more importantly, what are you doing today to get closer to those goals?The problem with saying you “want a million dollars” is that for 99% of people, it's an abstract goal based on nothing, and it'll go nowhere.

      • Darren says:

        Sorry I didn't word that as well as I could have. All the consideration and analysis wasn't to decide on a specific monetary amount, but rather it was a case of :
        "There are two ways I can do the next two decades or so of my life. I can either (A) Dedicate myself to working as smart as I possibly can to reach financial freedom even if it takes sacrifices, or (B) not worry about money, get a job or do some freelancing, etc. just to get by and just live modestly."

        However if we are talking figures, consider first class flights and high quality hotels. Now imagine flying 50-100 times per year, staying in hotels for the majority of these days, etc. Then think about bringing friends along and all that.

        Despite how I'm probably coming across here, I'm not all that materialistic. I want to money to fuel experiences, not the acquisition of 'things'. I also want to help out worthy causes, family, friends, etc. and for that, there's really no limit of money I could use. The more the better.

        As for what I'm doing today to get closer to the goals, I'm spending every single day becoming a better coder, working on business projects, planning out the road ahead, etc.

        I know the exact 99% of people you're referring to, though. I meet them on a regular basis.
        "Oh how I wish I'd win the lotto. I'd give anything for it."
        "Really? Why don't you puts the odds in your favor and go do some projects with the potential of making that much money? Why leave it up to chance? You own chance."
        "… Yeah well… *mumble* *mumble* Something about not having enough time *mumble*"

        I really don't understand this self-defeating attitude. It must be something to do with upbringing or just plain laziness, because if you want something bad enough, as long as it's theoretically possible, you will get it. No exceptions.

        Despite my age (which I'm sure is younger than the vast majority of your readers), I've made a fair few sacrifices already to get closer to my goals. Some regrettable, some turning out to be a blessing in disguise.

        Luck is what you make it.

  17. Perhaps the concept of 1 million dollars is just a euphamism for freedom. I’d be more concerned if he had said he wanted $976,254. People aren’t necessarily being literall when they say the want that much money, it’s just a handy figure of speech. Having travelled, I can totally agree with your advice however that it doesn’t cost a lot of money to sustain yourself. However, once you have the responsibility of a family (i.e. children) you do need a lot more money if you are going to travel.

    Thought provoking none the less, thanks for your post.

  18. Matt says:

    What if I really just want to buy fancy things and live in a decadent penthouse apartment with a terrific view?

  19. prb says:

    "freedom doesn’t cost a million dollars."

    "You can change, learn to live on your income, save money, travel on almost nothing, live abroad, follow your dreams. "

    These seem somewhat opposed – What if I want the freedom not to have to change. What if I want the freedom to live in a bigger house in the same nice area where I currently live, near my friends and family; be an early adopter on the coolest new tech toy; have a few children; take them on diverse holidays staying in the finest hotels; all without having to go to work or think about earning an income. Oh, and I want all that freedom, now, and risk-free, rather than working on developing my passive income streams for the next few years, with the chance that it won't pay off much at all.

    Now, a million dollars won't buy all of that freedom, but nor will "not a million dollars". At the moment, I go to work and live reasonably well, but comfortably within my means. I make certain financial compromises in order to have the financial freedom to do other things, but surely freedom wouldn't require the compromise of me.

    • ryanwaggoner says:

      You're really twisting the word freedom here to suit your own purposes.

      • bodvar says:

        To be honest, I chose the first definition in the OED: "the power or right to act , speak, or think as one wants", with emphasis on the "power" part, rather than the "right" part, as I obviously already have the right to act in the manner I describe, if only I had the cash.

        My point was more about the slightly jarring juxtaposition of those two sentences I quote, more than about the freedom of my rather excessive example.

      • dude says:

        As are you.

  20. John M. says:

    While a million dollars would be nice, if I suddenly had $10,000 that would mean the world to me. I could pay off all my debt, and get a new computer to start developing apps for iOS. Until that windfall happens, I'll continue to save as best I can, but you'd be amazed at how little money most people would need to be "lifechanging".

  21. TheKevan says:

    No, I really do want a million dollars, because it would give me a lot of freedom. However you have reminded me that there are plenty of other ways to get to that freedom, and that million dollars is just an improbable shortcut. I need to focus on the more realistic ways to get to that freedom.

    • ryanwaggoner says:

      Boom! There you go :) Don't stop shooting for building wealth, either, though. Provided you can do so without sacrificing the here and now on the altar of “when I get a million dollars…”

  22. Iain Dooley says:

    I've just been skimming through all the comments here and I really think that a lot of you are missing the point of this article because you're focussing on that fact that you know just what you would do with $1,000,000 and how much of a positive effect all these things would have on your life.

    You're focussing on finding edge cases of people who genuinely need exactly $1,000,000 to pay off a bunch of things that are holding them back that are to the value of $1,000,000 (but even then, there's plenty of places you can abscond to if you want to escape debt – you just may not be welcome to return :)

    The essential message in this article is lateral thinking. It's about looking at the mountain in front of you and noticing that there is a way around it instead of having to climb all the way up to the top and go back down the other side.

    Of course there are people and situations where this doesn't apply. The title of the article "YOU don't really want a million dollars" naturally invites these comments because he's addressing a large audience of people, many of whom may have legitimate needs for that amount of money.

    If it were me writing it I would have maybe phrased it as "Do you really want a million dollars?" and focused on the fact that the question is addressed specifically to the guy at the store who wanted a million to solve "all his problems" in some abstract way.

    That million dollars that will solve everything IS lazy thinking. It allows you to say "unless I have that million, I can't possibly solve my problems" without ever giving any real thought, or doing any real research, into whether or not there is an alternative way to solve your problems other than "getting a million dollars" which for most people is an impossibility.

    I personally think that the author could have done a better job with this article because although I came to agree with it's premise after reading it twice then reviewing the comments, I was also initially thrown off the scent by listing all of the things I'd do with a million dollars if I had it.

    • ryanwaggoner says:

      Thanks for the support :) The title could have been a bit better, but I threw it together quickly. It's encouraged some good conversation, so there's that :)

  23. mebigfatguy says:

    When you're a million dollars in the hole, you want a million dollars.

    • ryanwaggoner says:

      I highly doubt that guy was. I highly doubt almost anyone I've heard pining for a million is a million in the hole.

  24. Office Space says:

    Peter Gibbons: What would you do if you had a million dollars?
    Lawrence: I'll tell you what I'd do, man: two chicks at the same time, man.
    Peter Gibbons: That's it? If you had a million dollars, you'd do two chicks at the same time?
    Lawrence: Damn straight. I always wanted to do that, man. And I think if I were a millionaire I could hook that up, too; 'cause chicks dig dudes with money.
    Peter Gibbons: Well, not all chicks.
    Lawrence: Well, the type of chicks that'd double up on a dude like me do.

    (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0151804/quotes)

  25. John Hunter says:

    Great stuff. Some practical questions:

    How do you chose where to settle in SE Asia? Have you been able to find good internet connectivity outside big cities?

    Do you rent places for 6 months or a year? If not how do you find rentals that don’t break your budget?

    Do you need any special visas? Any advice in that area? It seems like many countries don’t have obvious visa choices for staying over 3 months if you don’t get an employer to get the right visa.

    I completely agree people far too often get caught up focusing on money instead of focusing on what they want out of life.

  26. freer says:

    How true: "if you can't be free without a million dollars, you probably won't be free with a million dollars"

    Also, not caring about 'up and down votes' on HN could also set one free.

  27. torvaun says:

    $18,000. That would be enough for me to start the business I want to run, which I'm completely positive would bring in enough money doing things I care about to stay in food and shelter.

    • ryanwaggoner says:

      So how are you going to do it?

      • torvaun says:

        Probably by working a job I don't care about and scraping to save every penny I can in a shitty economy. Possibly I'll manage to convince a bank to give me a business loan and then risk burnout trying to pay them off as quickly as possible.

        • ryanwaggoner says:

          Well, you've really started off on the wrong foot with those kinds of expectations. Why not try to get a job you love and not worry about the economy? What's your skillset? What kind of job would you enjoy having?

          • torvaun says:

            My skillset is wide and varied thanks to my personal set of neuroses. I have at least moderate skill in machining, drafting, carpentry, electronics, cooking, sewing, lock picking, shooting, sword fighting, chemistry, knots, PC tech support, soldering, writing, and probably a dozen other things that aren't popping up as relevant. My intent, the business I would get into with that eighteen thousand, would be gunsmithing. I've identified one niche that I am positive would be profitable, and I'm looking into a couple others that I believe would also work out quite well. But there are quite a few entry costs in machinery and licensing that are keeping me from starting now.

            What I'd like right now is a job where I keep gathering new skills or new experiences. Something not stagnant. Preferably something in central Wisconsin or that would pay to get me out to wherever the job needs me to be. If somewhere else, preferably somewhere where the average summer temperature is less than 85 degrees Fahrenheit and the average yearly snowfall is less than three feet.

          • ryanwaggoner says:

            What has been the response to your relentless attempts to get a job in gunsmithing or something related?

          • torvaun says:

            Relentless might be a little too strong of a word. Machining is one of the newest of my skills, I've only felt confident enough to search out a job in it for less than a month. What I've learned in that time is that this is not an economic climate conducive to hiring for machine shops.

  28. Don says:

    The only thing that is stopping me isn't the money it's the health insurance. I could probably live comfortably on less then a quarter of what I am making.

    My girlfriend had the stomach flu and that triggered a problem with her diabetes, so she had to go to the hospital for 4 days. We were lucky that she was on cobra prior to going in otherwise it would have cost about 5 to 10k a day.

    If health insurance wasn't an issue we would both be happy artists making enough to live and travel and a bit to save.

    • ryanwaggoner says:

      Have you checked to see what you'd have to pay for health insurance if you bought it yourself? It might not be as bad as you think….

  29. Don says:

    The only thing that is stopping me isn't the money it's the health insurance. I could probably live comfortably on less then a quarter of what I am making.

    My girlfriend had the stomach flu and that triggered a problem with her diabetes, so she had to go to the hospital for 4 days. We were lucky that she was on cobra prior to going in otherwise it would have cost about 5 to 10k a day.

    Last year I got an eye infection and was 2 or 3 days before my insurance was up from a job I was laid off from. If I would have gotten sick just 2 days later I would have had to make the decision to pay up to 5k or loose an eye to the infection.

    If health insurance wasn't an issue we would both be happy artists making enough to live and travel and a bit to save

  30. Adam says:

    You seem to be taking a bit of flack for that post.

    However I completely agree with you. Your life is created, not given to you.

    Life is not about taking vacations, it is about creating something. If you take enough time off you will get an urge to start doing something more meaningful.

    It is also an interesting fact to note that people who are given money never manage to keep it. Lotto winners normally end up poorer than before because they couldn't handle the money, spent too much and now are in deep debt unable to get out because they don't know how to create money.

    • ryanwaggoner says:

      I don't mind flack as long as people don't lash out with ad hominem attacks. I'm sure there are flaws in my reasoning, and I want to hear them.

  31. Tonio says:

    There's a big difference between bumming around SE Asia while freelancing when you're young and single and doing something similar when you're not-so-young and have kids. I'm not suggesting that traveling the world on a shoestring budget isn't a fine thing to do, but don't assume because you seem to have the answer _right now_ that you've achieved some kind of enlightened state. Ten years for now you'll be wondering where your life went.

    • ryanwaggoner says:

      I wasn't single. I'm not suggesting that it's no big deal to travel the world with kids, but lots of families have managed to do it without a million bucks. I have no idea how difficult or easy it is, so I won't comment on that.Also, maybe you shouldn't assume that my life will go like yours :)

  32. abr0414 says:

    I believe that true freedom doesn't come with money, it comes with enjoyment of your life. My dad has one of the highest paying manufacturing jobs in my home town. Believe me, I grew up to see him hate his job and he told me to never just settle for steady. With that being said, I have begun to work off and on, picked a cheap apartment, and stopped sweating the small stuff. I'm as free as one can dream to be right now.

    Freedom is a mentality, not a tax bracket.

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  34. Steven says:

    I have to disagree with Tim Ferriss' view in some degree. It totally depends on the individual and who you are. If I want to take mini-vacations as Tim suggest, sure that works out well. In this case, I rather have millions in the bank so I can take a permanent vacation. I don't want to have to work ever and the argument of you can never stop working because you need something to do… I want to do them without worrying about covering my expenses from month to month with some muse. A permanent solution is much better.

    I totally agree money doesn't solve everything and for some if not many, having it won't necessarily change anything. But haven been on both sides of the table of being poor and having money, being a person who wanted a lot to being a minimalist, I am now more confident than ever, I would like to be something similar to Steve Jobs… Have a ton of money, live a minimalistic life, and work out of passion and IGNORE the concern of a muse or any of that other bullshit.

    tl;dr Millions trump fucking side income any day of the week depending on who you are and what your goals are. Freedom are provided in both scenario.

  35. [...] 【英文原文】:You don’t really want a million dollars [...]

  36. [...]   [英文出处]:You don’t really want a million dollars [...]

  37. andrew says:

    i want 5 k to buy my first car :(

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